Foundations: Social Media for Social Change [8/28 1pET]

Shame on me for not sharing #SMchat more more of the people I know on Twitter. It remains one of the most authentic, high return-on–time things I do in the Twittersphere.

#SMCHAT

Focus on Social Change

Last month we made great progress on what social change might look like through a social media lens. We had an in-depth, hour-long discussion on key factors and enablers.

Because this could help reinforce the foundation for our series, I’ve completed a deep read of our 7/24 #smchat transcript, capturing some highlights. I tried to provide attribution to key ideas too; if you’re thinking “Wait, that’s not what I meant!” .. let me know, and I’ll make updates.

Where do we begin?

The start of a Social Change definition might look like this:

Social change using social media requires engaging, empowering and connecting a community to reach a goal, making a statement and difference (any means) (Kelly B)

Here are some more key takeaways from the same transcript:

  • Social change is organic, starting with people (Marc)
  • Social change requires visible impact and it must be…

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4 Manifestos for Change Makers

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'Stand Your Ground.' photo (c) 2010, akshay moon - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

It’s ironic, don’t you think?

It’s ironic how we respond to change. We want change, yet we fear it. We crave change, then we claw at it.

We’d rather slip to the back of the line (of change) than butt our way to the front. We shrink, we hide, we duck.

Screw change. Let someone else do it.

So goes the sentiment of far too many people. There’s little chance of upside. If you stick your neck out, there’s risk; there’s no guarantee of reward. Failure is possible and humiliation is downright probable.

And this is how we end up swirling around in the toilet of mediocrity.

Change may scare. But mediocrity kills.

10 Random Questions: From One Creative to Another

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Annie Leibovitz Portrait

Annie Leibovitz by John Keatly

Moment of truth. Today I couldn’t bring myself to write about anything social, trending, controversial, educational or overly deep.  So coffee in hand I let my thoughts tumble around, and they landed (bullseye) on something I’ve always wanted to do.

Shoot Me, Annie.

My secret wish has long been to appear in Vanity Fair‘s Proust Questionnaire column.

I’d be witty, honest, and bang-on with my answers. My sparkle would mesmerize the writer. In a flash, they decide to break tradition of using a caricature. The creative director would come careening into the room with an unexpected Annie Leibovitz in tow. My hair would have it’s best day EVER, and my skin would be clear and creamy — no Photoshop needed.  The published piece would paradoxically leave me awed and humbled. My mother would wipe a proud tear from her crinkly eyes as she read my words.

Well, some dreams come true and others — ones like my tongue-in-cheek Vanity Fair fantasy — may forever be a fable. So what’s a creative girl to do when she still longs for some good Q&A? She whips up her very own questionnaire for all those people who — like her –don’t mind peeling back the layers and sharing who they are.

So here you have it. 10 very random questions I’d ask YOU if we had a sit-down to compare the minds and ways of being right-brainers.

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Stop Reading and Start Doing

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I read. A lot. Books, blogs, reports, research. Tweets (of course). You name it; I read it. Throughout my adult life  I’ve believed that I read because I’m curious. I’ve told myself and others that I read because I am a proud life-long learner.

Of course I am both of those things. But if, like me, you spend more time reading than doing, you may detect the deeper problem here — can you spot it?

Truth is, there is a deeper story. I read because I’m scared. I read to avoid what I do best, which is write.  In my moment of truth I had to ask, am I really learning or simply running?

Do you read as a way to postpone real action? It’s cool if you don’t want to raise your hand. I’ll be honest; writing this blog post is uncomfortable. It stirs feelings of shame that here I am — with a God-given talent — and I’m not fully using it. I’m hiding in the pages of someone else’s good writing.

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CFCA’s 5 Best Practices for Growing a Facebook Community

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This guest blog post was written by Shanxi Omoniyi, online content manager for Christian Foundation for Children and Aging (CFCA). Founded in 1981, CFCA is a nonprofit sponsorship organization serving more than 300,000 children, youth and aging friends in 22 countries. 

At CFCA we value the opportunity that social media provides in helping us create a community of compassion around the world.

Hopefully these best practices we’ve compiled can help other nonprofits harness the enthusiasm of their Facebook supporters to continue making the world a better place!

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How to Look More Thoughtful Than You Really Are

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Alright, kiddos, today I’m offering a lesson that will serve you well in the new year. Listen up, because I’m about to share 5 straight-up steps to looking more thoughtful than you do today.

Thoughtfulness, you ask?  Where’s the relevance? What’s the pay off? Whether it’s at work, in your love life or — for God’s sake — with your own sweet mother, thoughtfulness will smooth out many a bump in the road of life.

Square one: understand why this matters.

Think back to a pleasant surprise you’ve experienced (I said pleasant, so please play along). Got one? Now, think of another. And, since I’m seeking to demonstrate a point, please think of one more.

What do those surprises have in common? Ah, yes. Thoughtfulness. It is, don’t you see, the root of all surprises and delights.

If you’re not a “surprises and delights” kind of person, that’s cool. Let’s me give it to you another way… demonstrating thoughtfulness is the ticket to being memorable.  And in the words of novelist Isabel Allende, “You only have what you give.”

You only have what you give. True thoughtfulness, therefore, will get you everything.

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The iPad, my Blog, and Clicky Keyboards

Eerily similar to “the dog ate my homework,” I have a perfectly good reason for allowing my blog to grow weeds. Pure and simple, it is the fault of technology.

As my laptop wheezed its way to certain death, my iPad was working a diabolical plot. With its hip energy and snuggle-in-bed-affection, it lured me into believing I (a writer) could live on iMac and iPad alone.

Simply put, I was left unfulfilled. I crave a clicky keyboard. I miss composing content in my PJs on the couch. Mobility seems crippled without multi-tasking.

I need a laptop.

Though I have lived and loved in an Apple world, my next laptop won’t bear the logo of the forbidden fruit. That’s not to say I’ll stop playing with apps (such as Blogsy) in my pursuit of writer mojo.

It does mean, though, that I’ll be back to blogging in my pajamas soon.